About

“Elijah J. Magnier is a veteran war-zone correspondent and political analyst with over 35 years of experience covering the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). He specialises in real-time reporting of politics, strategic and military planning, terrorism and counter-terrorism; his strong analytical skills complement his reporting. His in-depth experience, extensive contacts and thorough political knowledge of complex political situations in Iran, Iraq, Lebanon, Libya, Sudan and Syria make his writings mandatory reading for those wishing to understand complicated affairs that are routinely misreported and propagandised in the Western press.

Magnier has covered many of the key wars and military clashes in the region, including the 1982 Israeli invasion of Lebanon, the Iraq-Iran War, the Lebanese Civil War, the Gulf War of 1991, the 1992 – 1996 war in the former Yugoslavia, the 2003 US invasion of Iraq and subsequent war and occupation, the second Lebanon War in 2006, as well as the more recent wars in both Libya and Syria. Having lived for many years in Lebanon, Bosnia, Iraq, Iran, Libya and Syria, Elijah J. Magnier possesses unique insights into local cultural and tribal affairs, geopolitical realities and trends, and the history of a region that continues to pose challenges for both its residents and the world” (Frankie.P).

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21 thoughts on “About

  1. Good morning, Mr. Magnier. I was looking for a way to communicate with you, found this page, and with all due respect, I hope I am not trespassing. I found my way to your blog thanks to what I call a “copy and paste” blog whose name is not worth mentioning. I noticed your tweets (or facebook, don’t remember, I don’t do social networks), were frequently quoted, and with everything, why not migrate to the source? I agree with most of the positive comments I read above, and for me your blog is obligatory reading to navigate the rocky waters of a region you know so well.

    The issue I bring to you today is the frequent glitches I encounter when posting comments on your articles, in what I call a “hit or miss” system. It used to be easier to post until recently, when comments go through moderation, an obligatory step in every blog I post, and nothing happens. Other times, same post, no problem. One is left wondering the reason for the moderator to block the comment, weather it was vocabulary (I don’t cuss or swear, on principle), is out of tune with the subject, a glitch in the system (my first suspect), or anything else, since no reason or explanation is offered.

    My “trick” has been to wait 24 hours, then post again, and it usually takes it, no problem. I limit my tries posting a comment to 2, hoping the site manager will have to notice someone is trying to post, in case cyber dogs ate the first one. A third time would be trespassing, in my book, and my respect for your work will keep me from doing that. All I am trying to do is understand the comment system, so I don’t run into trouble with your or your site manager. For example, yesterday I tried posting on the third and final of the “richly informative triptych” as I call the three article series on the “Deal of the Century.” It went for moderation. This morning, I tried again, and it went for moderation. Would you be so kind as to explain how it works?

    If I have trespassed in any way, shape, or form, my apologies, I hold your work in high regard, and have the utmost respect for it.

    Lone Wolf

    1. Dear LW. Honestly speaking I have no idea how it works. I approve every and each comment except insults. People can agree or disagree (when they disagree I like it even more because it creates debate and allows people to think of alternatives or another approach. people can write 10 pages or one line I doesn’t bother me. People can express their opinion and it is an open platform for everybody. I’ll go through the “moderate” automated system to see if I can disable it. Honestly, I am not very tech but will invest time to make sure every single post goes through. I am Sorry for the inconviniency.

      1. Dear Mr. Magnier, I thank you very much for the clarification, and I have a favor to ask you. My comment appeared twice at the bottom of your third article on the “Deal of the Century” series, would you mind to delete the second one? I posted it with some notes for me at the bottom, and it went without editing when I posted it. Thanks!!!

        Lone Wolf

  2. Elijah J Magnier,

    I enjoy your writing, and I feel that you are an important reporter of issues that are routinely lied about in the western press. I am unable to donate at present, but I have edited the English introduction found at the bottom of your articles. Please find it below. It is clear to me that the Resistance, from the legitimate government of Syria to Hezzbollah, to the Shiite militias in Iraq and on to the Islamic Republic of Iran, is in need of articulate English writers to present their cases to English-speaking audiences who might be more accepting to thier narratives and arguments than one might expect from reading the western media.

    Elijah J Magnier is a veteran war zone correspondent and political analyst with over 35 years experience covering the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). He specializes in real-time reporting of politics, strategic and military planning, terrorism and counter-terrorism; his strong analytical skills complement his reporting. His in-depth experience, extensive contacts and thorough political knowledge of complex political situations in Iran, Iraq, Lebanon, Libya, Sudan and Syria make his writings mandatory reading for those wishing to understand complicated affairs that are routinely misreported and propagandized in the Western press. Magnier has covered many of the key wars and military clashes in the region, including the 1982 Israeli invasion of Lebanon, the Iraq-Iran War, the Lebanese Civil War, the Gulf War of 1991, the 1992 – 1996 war in the former Yugoslavia, the 2003 US invasion of Iraq and subsequent war and occupation, the second Lebanon War in 2006, as well as the more recent wars in both Libya and Syria. Having lived for many years in Lebanon, Bosnial, Iraq, Iran, Libya and Syria, Elijah J Magnier possesses unique insights into local cultural and tribal affairs, geopolitical realities and trends, and the history of a region that continues to pose challenges for both its residents and the world.

  3. You should add RSS feed to all the sharing services. RSS constructs a feed accessed with an RSS reader, doesn’t require joining some social media network. It’s more convenient than an email subscription.

    I find your writing very valuable and important. Please keep up the good work

  4. I hope you have read Saudi bodyguard written by Mark young who worked as Saudi Royal bodyguard for years .I hope these copies should b sent to Thomas Friedman and Newyork times .It is disgusting how westen media and diplomats are such a buyable commodity

  5. The IS was self declared. It was never recognized therefore Official except in the press worldwide, including unfortunately the Arab Press. No there is no definitive date as when it began…

  6. Hi , it depends which answer suits you the best – 1.Date of proclaiming a caliphate – the official one is 29.06.2014. But the very beginning is somewhere around 2006.

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